Scientists baffled by sudden brightness of our galaxy's supermassive black hole
Mnn.com - Tue 13 Aug 16:13 GMT

Sagittarius A* flashed 75 times brighter than ever recorded.

  And, since it's the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way, it's a little hard to ignore.

  "It was strange because I had never seen the black hole that bright before," Do tells New Scientist.

  "Maybe more gas is falling into the black hole and that leads to higher amounts of accretion, which leads to it being brighter," Do adds in New Scientist.

  There's also a chance the black hole finally got around to eating a gaseous object identified as G2, which was found to be approaching Sagittarius A* in 2014.

  Unless, of course, you consider that a black hole not only doesn't care for napkins, but also the rules of time and space.

  Then the question is, what happens when the fabric of space and time is ripped by a black hole?"

  Scientists baffled by sudden brightness of our galaxy's supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* flashed 75 times brighter than ever recorded.